Electrical Directory

THE KITE WIND GENERATOR

THE KITE WIND GENERATOR

Posted in Energy Inventions| Sanjay Technical | Wind Power | Wind Turbines

Kite Wind GeneratorIt’s an expert estimation that the total energy stored in wind is 100 times higher than actually needed by humans on this earth. The catch is that we have to learn and devise ways to trap this wind power blowing across the planet earth. Experts tell us one more thing that most of the wind energy is available at high altitude and we can’t manufacture turbines of that height. So we have to think of new ways to trap that wind power blowing at a significant height. Some experts estimate that the total energy contained in wind is 100 times the amount needed by everyone on the planet. However, most of this energy is at high altitudes, far beyond the reach of any wind turbine.

Now researchers want to create something like a kite that can float at a higher altitude to trap the wind energy.

Kite Wind Generator

The Kite Wind Generator simply known as KiteGen is an Italian company. They are installing kites that sprout from funnel like structures. They are mounted on giant poles. When wind blows these kites come out of funnels. For short, use kites that spring from funnels on the end of giant poles when the wind blows. For each kite, winches release a pair of high-resistance cables to control direction and angle. These kites are light and ultra-resistant. These kites are similar to those used for kite surfing – light and ultra-resistant, capable of flying up to a height of 2,000 meters.

KiteGen people have thought of new ways to exploit the wind power existing at an altitude. They have discarded the usual heavy and static plants like current wind turbines, but opted for light, dynamic and intelligent ones. They have installed all the light devices in the air and heavy ones on the ground for generating power. The basics of the wind turbines and KiteGen are same. But they have moved the heaviest parts to the ground. They claim that the resulting structure, base foundation included, is much lighter and cheaper. They have also provided flexibility regarding the height of kites. If the wind is strong at certain height, the height of the kite too can be adjusted accordingly. If today wind if blowing nicely at 1000m, say, kites can be adjusted at the same height. If tomorrow the strong wind is blowing at certain other height, wind kites can be flown at that height to gain maximum advantage of the wind power.

The swirling kites prompt KiteGen’s core in motion, and the rotation activates large alternators producing a current. They also have a control system on autopilot. This control system manipulates the flight pattern so that maximum power can be generated be it night or day. The KiteGen people are concerned with the environment too. They don’t want the lives of birds to be affected by their flying kites. So they have installed the advanced radar system that can redirect kites within seconds in case they detect flying of birds.

The cost of the technology is US$750,000 and it won’t takes acres and acres of space like a wind farm. You can install the whole machinery within a diameter of just 100 meters. KiteGen claim that they can produce half a GW of energy, and produce it at a cost of US$2.5 per GW. Its creators, Sequoia Automation, say a 2,000 meter-version would generate 5GW of power.

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Bloom Energy Technology

 

How a SOFC Works

BLOOM ENERGY

Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

Fuel cells were invented over a century ago and have been used in practically every NASA mission since the 1960's, but until now, they have not gained widespread adoption because of their inherently high costs.

Legacy fuel cell technologies like proton exchange membranes (PEMs), phosphoric acid fuel cells (PAFCs), and molten carbonate fuel cells (MCFCs), have all required expensive precious metals, corrosive acids, or hard to contain molten materials. Combined with performance that has been only marginally better than alternatives, they have not been able to deliver a strong enough economic value proposition to overcome the status quo.

Some makers of legacy fuel cell technologies have tried to overcome these limitations by offering combined heat and power (CHP) schemes to take advantage of their wasted heat. While CHP does improve the economic value proposition, it only really does so in environments with exactly the right ratios of heat and power requirements on a 24/7/365 basis. Everywhere else the cost, complexity, and customization of CHP tends to outweigh the benefits.

For decades, experts have agreed that solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) hold the greatest potential of any fuel cell technology. With low cost ceramic materials, and extremely high electrical efficiencies, SOFCs can deliver attractive economics without relying on CHP. But until now, there were significant technical challenges inhibiting the commercialization of this promising new technology. SOFCs operate at extremely high temperature (typically above 800°C). This high temperature gives them extremely high electrical efficiencies, and fuel flexibility, both of which contribute to better economics, but it also creates engineering challenges.

Bloom has solved these engineering challenges. With breakthroughs in materials science, and revolutionary new design, Bloom's SOFC technology is a cost effective, all-electric solution.

Over a century in the making, fuel cells are finally clean, reliable, and most importantly, affordable.

Click here to see how a Solid Oxide Fuel Cell works.

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POWER FROM TWO ENERGY SOURCES?

POWER FROM TWO ENERGY SOURCES?

Posted in Energy Inventions | Future Technology

Two Energy SourcesAlternative sources of energy are clean and green but the catch is they generate less energy compared to fossil fuels. So now the scientists are trying to use different sources of alternative energy at the same place and same time to generate power. Attempts are being made to combine two forms of external energy sources such as light and heat or light and vibration to generate external energy so that enough energy can be collected for practical use. Fujitsu Laboratories have now succeeded in using hybrid energy sources to generate power. Fujitsu Laboratories wants to provide this technology for commercial use by the year 2015.

Fujitsu Laboratories: Making power from two sources of energy

Fujitsu Laboratories are working extensively in this regard, and to generate electricity both from heat and light, they are creating a new hybrid energy harvesting device. Energy harvesting is the procedure used in accumulating energy from the environment. Later on that energy is transformed into electricity. Fujitsu is not doing something innovative. Work in this field was done by scientists earlier too. But hybrid energy could only be generated by combining separate devices and that proved costly so it was commercially unviable.

Reducing the cost

Now Fujitsu laboratories confirm that two separate devices are not needed to generate electricity from a hybrid source. How were they successful in reducing costs? They used organic materials for creating hybrid device. This lowers the cost, and the new technology is showing promise to convert energy from the environment to electricity. The device from Fujitsu Laboratories is just a one-piece device that catches energy from the most common form of energy available for large scale use.

The use of organic material

An organic material of high efficiency that can generate power from both photovoltaic and thermoelectric mode has been developed by Fujitsu Laboratories. This organic material can make power both from heat in thermoelectric mode and indoor lighting in photovoltaic mode. The production cost is very low because of the organic materials and the processing costs are very low. The device can be made to work as a thermoelectric generator or photovoltaic cell by changing the electrical circuit connecting P-type and N-type semiconductors.

Advantages of the technology

  • It helps to get energy from two different sources by using one device.
  • The technology enables the use of alternative energy and sensors in the areas, where till now it was forbidden. It can now power medical sensing technology and sensor networks. It can sensor those monitors without any battery or electric wire that are used to check conditions like, heartbeats, body temperature and blood pressure.
  • There is no need for battery or electric wire.
  • Because this technology is not costly, it can be widely used.
  • This technology is a very efficient way of gathering energy from external sources.
  • Since the device works with the help of both heat and light, it will continue to work if one of these energy sources remains unavailable.
  • It can work in remote areas.
  • It can help to forecast environmental conditions.

For Fujitsu Laboratories, combining two different sources of generating energy to produce power is just the beginning. They want to make this technology more efficient so that by combining two sources of producing energy, hybrid equipment can be made to work better.

POSSIBLE DUAL ROTOR TECHNOLOGY FOR WIND TURBINES

POSSIBLE DUAL ROTOR TECHNOLOGY FOR WIND TURBINES

Posted in Energy Inventions | Sanjay Technical website | Wind Power | Wind Turbines

Dual Rotor Wind Turbine
Iowa State Aerospace Engineers Anupam Sharma and Hui Hu are exploring the possibility of adding a smaller, secondary rotor to wind turbines. The engineers studied the base of existing turbines and found two major problems. First, they are big round structural pieces that don’t harvest any wind energy because they are not shaped like an airfoil. Second, the large base of the blades actually disrupt the wind, causing a wake behind them which reduces the energy harvesting capacity of any downwind turbines. Hu says that a turbine in the slipstream of another “can lose 8 to 40 percent of its energy production, depending on conditions.”

Their solution? Add a second, smaller rotor. “To try to solve these problems, we put a small rotor on the turbine,” Hu said. “And we found that with two rotors on the same tower, you get more energy.” Lab tests and computer simulations found the extra blades and increase the energy harvest by up to 18 percent. “These are fairly mature technologies we’re talking about – a 10 to 20 percent increase is a large change,” Sharma said.

Using a one-year, $116,000 grant from the Iowa Energy Center, the pair is currently using wind tunnels and computer simulations to study the dual rotor idea and measure power outputs and wind loads. The questions they hope to answer are: How is the wake distributed? Where are the whirling vortices? How could the wake be manipulated to pull down air and recharge the wind load?

They plan to use the research results to find the best aerodynamic design for a dual-rotor turbine. The goal is to find out where the second rotor should be located, how big it should be, what kind of airfoil it should have, and if it should rotate in the same direction or in the opposite direction.

Dual Rotor Wind Turbine Simulation
The above image (courtesy of Anupam Sharma) shows air flowing through a dual-rotor turbine. Read more details about the research over at the Iowa State website.and Sanjay Technical website

What do you think? Could a second rotor make wind turbines more efficient? Leave your comments below…

TREE SHAPED WIND TURBINES TO BE INSTALLED IN PARIS

TREE SHAPED WIND TURBINES TO BE INSTALLED IN PARIS

Posted in Energy Inventions | Sanjay Technical  | Wind Power | Wind Turbines

wind-turbine-tree-leaves
A French company called New Wind is installing tree-shaped wind turbines at the Place de la Concorde in Paris, France. The company’s founder, Jérôme Michaud-Larivière came up with the idea while in a Paris square, when he “saw the leaves tremble when there was not a breath of air.” He hopes the trees can be used to exploit small air currents flowing along buildings and streets, and could eventually be installed in people’s yards and urban centres.

 

 

 

He is the first to admit the efficiency of the trees is low compared to more consistent currents higher up, but believes the £23,500 trees are more viable and less intrusive than ‘monstrous’conventional wind turbines. The 26 foot high trees, which use tiny blades inside the ‘leaves’, could potentially be profitable after a year of wind speeds averaging 7.8 mph. They can generate electricity in wind speeds as low as 4.5 mph. Scroll down for more photos and the video.

Photos

tree-shaped-wind-turbinesnew-wind-turbinesnew-windnew-wind-turbines-paris

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THE SPHERICAL SUN POWER GENERATOR

THE SPHERICAL SUN POWER GENERATOR

Posted in | Sanjay technical | Future Technology | Solar Power

beta-ray-generator
German Architect Andre Broessel believes he has a solution that can “squeeze more juice out of the sun”, even during the night hours and in low-light regions. His company Rawlemon has created a spherical sun power generator prototype called the beta.ray. His technology will combine spherical geometry principles with a dual axis tracking system, allowing twice the yield of a conventional solar panel in a much smaller surface area. The futuristic design is fully rotational and is suitable for inclined surfaces, walls of buildings, and anywhere with access to the sky. It can even be used as an electric car charging station. Scroll down for photos and videos…

“The beta.ray comes with a hybrid collector to convert daily electricity and thermal energy at the same time. While reducing the silicon cell area to 25% with the equivalent power output by using our ultra transmission Ball Lens point focusing concentrator, it operates at efficiency levels of nearly 57% in hybrid mode. At nighttime the Ball Lens can transform into a high-power lamp to illuminate your location, simply by using a few LED’s. The station is designed for off grid conditions as well as to supplement buildings’ consumption of electricity and thermal circuits like hot water.”

How it works:

sun-power-generator

The modular collector system charges and stores energy during daylight hours and can even collect energy from the moon during night hours:
solar-collector-systembetaray-night

Suitability for conventional CPV and thermal power plants:
conventional-cpv-thermal

Suitability for solar hybrid power plants with Rawlemon technologies:
rawlemon-technology-potential

Electric Car Charging Station:
electric-car-charging-station

More Photos:

betaraybetaray-home-generatorbetaray-prototypebetaray-sun-power

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What Exactly Is A Smart Grid? Smart Grid Applications

What is Grid?

Concept of smart grid is quite in the news and market but majority of the people actually don’t know that what exactly are the things which make a grid smart?

The term “Grid” refer to an “Electric Grid” basically describes a complete network which includes transmission lines, transformers, distribution substation all accessories that are used for delivery of electricity from generation plants to home and commercial scale.What is Smart Grid?

The very first grid was built in decade of 1885-1895 and the with the passage of the time number of grids kept on increasing that’s why by now there are about more than 9200 grids all over the world which are providing about 1 million Megawatt power to the consumers.

As evolution has a direct relation with time so for an efficient functionality of grid, digital technology has been introduced in grid system. This new digital technology enables two way communications which guarantees the direct link between utilities and all consumers.

What is a Smart Grid Then?

In simple words, an automation system between utility and consumers. This smart grid consist of advance digital system, automation, computer and control which make sure to perform a duplex “two way” communication between the power provider and load consumer. 

In a typical electrical grid system, electricity provider only will know the power failure when a costumer call them. But in case of smart grid system, if electric supply fails, service provider will automatically respond to the affected area because the components of smart grid  provides enough data i.e. from the power transformer, main transmission and distribution system and finally, to the home supply system (you may say the utility meter).

What Things Make a Grid “Smart”?

According to the Department of Energy (United States), Four types of advance technology will transform a typical electrical grid into Smart Grid which are as follow:

  1. Fully automated and Integrated two way communication between the overall components of an electric grid.
  2. Automatic Control for power distribution, faults and repairs.
  3. Advance management panel, decision support software and mechanism.
  4. Accurate sensing and measurement technologies.

What is exactly a smart grid and their operations?Upgraded technology of smart grids has well-organized automation equipment and control system, whose response is accurate to meet the rapidly increasing demand for electricity. Time when these smart grids were not implemented all utilities companies were bound to send their respective workers to take meter reading and acquire data related to consumer.

What does a Smart Grid do?

Smart grid performs lots of smart jobs :) . Some advantages of a smart grid are stated follow:

Efficient Transmission and Distribution of Electric Power.
Quickly restore electric power after power failure due to faults.
Lower cost for operation, maintenance, management  and electricity for both utilities and consumers.
Lower electric power tariff and rates due to reduced peak demand.
Provide better options of integration of renewable energy for self power generation systems.
Improve the security and protection.

Applications of a Smart Grid System.

Deployment of Digital Technology in smart grids ensures the reliability, efficiency and accessibility to the consumers regarding all utilities which count towards the economic stability of the nation. Right at the start of transition time it become perilous to execute testing, to improve the technology by up gradation, developing and maintaining standards on a standard threshold and also application of these efficient grids serve all these problems

Basic applications of smart grids are

  • They improve the adeptness of transmission lines
  • Quick recovery after any sudden breakage/disturbance in lines and feeders
  • Cost Reduction
  • Reduction of peak demand
  • They possess the ability to be integrated with renewable energy sources on a large level which leads to sharing of load and reduction of load on large scale

What does a Smart Grid do?

Summery

In these days disruption of power supply is very common issue faced by majority in which any fault in feeder or main distribution lines lead to a complete blackout due to which whole system will be out of order and functionality of industries will be stopped.

But smart grid system has capability to secure the system on the spot by handling emergencies because they possess the ability of automatic rerouting in case of any fault current . Smart Grids are not only providing the link between consumers and utilities moreover they enable users to handle their electricity usage systematically like we use online banking from anywhere any time.

Management of electricity in well-organized matter will clearly lead to cost reduction. One of the interesting application is smart meters. With the help of smart meters we need not to wait a whole month to get electricity bill rather we can see reading and receive bill daily online which will obviously save money for consumers and save electricity or power for whole country which will provide support in economical stability of the country.

Coming toward the precautions as this system has wide range of technical data and equipment along with automation equipments and protocols, so most important thing will be to ensure whether the system is properly installed because, if there will be no loop holes in deployment of this technology, smart grids on global level will bring revolution in power sector same as internet did transformation in the World of IT.For More Details

How To Locate Faults In Cables? Cable Faults, Types & Causes

Introduction to Faults in Cables

When electrical energy is generated in the generations’ stations, it is distributed to the different loads, i.e. cities, towns and villages for consumption then. The process involves stepping up the voltage to minimize the loss of energy in the form of heat. The stepped up voltage is distributed to grid stations where it is stepped down for distribution to the local transformers where it is finally stepped down and distributed to the consumers.

Distribution of the electrical energy is done via electrical cables. The cables are either insulated or uninsulated. The choice of using insulated or uninsulated (Overhead lines or Underground) cables mostly come into play when energy is to be conveyed in the underground installation process.

Unlike the insulated cables, faults in uninsulated cables are easily detected as the most common fault associated with such type of cable is cut and break in the cable or wire conductors.

In insulated cables especially the multicore cables, the faults are of different types and have many causes.
Before we discuss how to locate these commonly met faults, let’s see what the cable faults are and the possible causes and locating of these faults.How To Locate Faults In Cables? Cable Faults, Types & Causes

Types of Cable Faults

Following are the types of Cable Faults Commonly Found In the underground Cables.

  • Open-Circuit Faults: Open circuit fault is a kind of fault that occurs as a result of the conductor breaking or the conductor being pulled out of its joint. In such instances, there will be no flow of current at all as the conductor is broken (conveyor of electric current).
  • Short-circuit or cross fault: This kind of fault occurs when the insulation between two cables or between two multi-core cables gets damaged. In such instances, the current will not flow through the main core which is connected to load but will flow directly from one cable to another or from one core or multi-core cable to the other instead. The load will be short circuited.
  • Ground or earth faults: This kind of faults occurs when the insulation of the cable gets damaged. The current flowing through the faulty cable starts flowing from the core of the cable to earth or the sheath (cable protector) of the cable. Current will not flow through the load then.

Causes of Cable Faults

Faults in cables are mostly caused by dampness in the paper insulation of cables. As a result, it may damage the lead sheath which protecting the cable. Lead sheath can be damaged in many ways. Most of them are the chemical action of soil on the lead when buried, mechanical damage and crystallization of the lead through vibration.

How to Locate Faults in a Damaged Cable?

Before fixing any fault in cables, the fault has to be identified first. There are many ways to find the cable faults which are discussed as follow;

Different Types of Tests to locate faults in cables.

1. Blavier Test (For a Single Cable Faults)

When a ground fault occurs in a single cable and there is no other cables (without faulty one), then blavier test can be performed to locate the fault in a single cable.

In other words, in the absence of a sound cable to locate fault in the cable (to make a loop by connecting both cable as we do in the Murray loop test), then measurement of theresistance from one side or end is called blavier test.

In blavier test, resistance can be measured by two ways.

  • To insulate the far end of the cable
  • To ground (earthed) the far end of the cable as shown in the fig.

Ground fault of a single cable can be located using Blavier’s test. In this kind of test, low voltage supply, an ammeter and voltmeter are used in a bridge network. Resistance between one end of the cable (Sending End) and earth is measured while “Far End” is isolated from the earth.

Suppose we know the total resistance of a single core cable (before the fault) which is RΩ. And;

Fault to ground resistance = r
Resistance from the Far end to the cable fault = r1
Resistance from the testing end of the cable to the fault = r2

Blavier Test to Find the Cable's Fault LocationNow, we will connect and then disconnect the earth connection from the far end of the cable to measure two resistances. These measurements can be done by a LT (Low tension) supply and a bridge network.

First of all, We will insulate the far end of the cable to determine the resistance between line to ground which is;

R1 = r2 + r ………………………. (1)

Now, we will ground or earth the far end of the cable to find the resistance between line to ground again.

Blavier Test (For a Single Cable Fault)But the total resistance (before occurring the fault) was

R = r1 + r2 ……………………….. (3)

Solving the above equations for r2 (fault location or distance), we get
fault location in the cables

The value of x = r2 is generally less than the value of R2. Therefore, we consider (-)instead of (±) in the above equation.
Fault to ground fault

Loop Tests to finding Cable faults

These kinds of tests are carried out on short circuit faults or earth fault in underground cables. Cable faults can be easily located if a sound cable runs along with the grounded cables. Following are the types of loop tests.

  • Murray loop Test 
  • Varley loop Test.
  • Earth Overlap Test

2. Murray Loop Test

The connection on how a cable faults can be located using Murray loop test method is shown below.

Wheatstone bridge’s principle is used in murray loop test to find the cable faults. Ra and Rb are the two ratio arms consisting of resistors. G is a galvanometer. The cable having fault (Rx) is connected to the second cable (Sound cable Rc) through low resistance link at the far end. The Wheatstone bridge is kept in balance by adjusting resistance of the ratio arms Ra and Rb until the galvanometer deflection is zero.Murray loop Test for ground fault in the cables
Thus… 
Murray Loop Test

Solving for x, we get;

Single & Double Cables Fault location by Murray Loop Testwhere

l = length of a single cable (In meters of yards)
2l = total length of two cables
x = distance from the upper side to the fault

3. Varley Loop Test

The only difference between Murray loop test and Varley loop test is that Varley loop test provision is made for measurement of total loop resistance instead obtaining it from the relation

laws of resistance for cable fault

In this test, the ratio arms Ra and Rb are fixed and balance position is obtained by varying the known variable resistance (Rheostat).

As we have explained the equation in above section of murray loop test… the story is same for varley test as well…Varley Loop Test for short circuit fault in the cables

For earth Fault or short circuit fault in the cables, the switch key is first thrown to position 1, the variable resistance S is varied till the bridge is balanced for resistance value of S1. So,
When key is on Position 1

earth Fault or short circuit fault in the cables

When key is on Position 2
difference between Murray loop test and Varley loop testFrom equation 1 and 2, we get,

faults in the cablesSince the value of Ra, Rb, S1 and S2 are known, the value of Rx can be determined then by
Loop Resistance = 
Loop Resistance for cable faultsIf “r” is the resistance of the cable per meter length, then, distance of the cable fault from the test end is

cable fault4. Earth Overlap Test

In earth overlap test, two measurements are performed (instead of one as in Blavier test). The first measurement of resistance is R1 (between Line to ground i.e. from the testing end to the far (earthed) end).
The second measurement of resistance is R2 (between Line to ground i.e from the far end and the testing (earthed) end).
Both measurements are equal as follows:

Earth Overlap Test to locate faults in cables

As in the Blavier test, we also suppose that we know the actual resistance of the cable before the cable fault which is R.

R = r1+r2

Earth Overlap Test5. Open Circuit Test

Open circuit fault can be occurs when cable is pulled out of its joint or a break occurs in the cable. Such a fault can be traced by carrying out capacity test. The capacitance of the faulty cable is measured from both ends of the cable either by means of ballistic galvanometer or by bridge method. Capacitance of the cable to the ground is proportional to the length of the cable.

6. Potential Fall Test

In Potential fall test, Ammeter, voltmeter, Variable resistor (rheostat) and battery are connected as shown below to find the fault location in the cable. This test is carried out with the help of a sound cable that has no fault running along the faulty cable as shown belowPotential Fall Test to find Cable FaultsThe fault point distance can be given as:

Potential Fall TestWhere

V1 and V2 = the voltmeter readings at point A and B;
L = length of the faulty core

X = length of core between fault and testing end A.

 

We will add more tests and techniques in this post to find cable faults. Stay tune. Thanks.

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Schedule of hearings before APERC as on 18.06.2015

S.No. Case No. Petitioner Respondent Subject / Prayer 1 O.P.No. 25 of 2013 & I.A. No. 15 of 2013 Singaraya Hills Green Power Genco (P) Ltd APSPDCL & 3 others Petition u/s 86 (1) (f) of the Electricity Act, 2003 for resolution of several issues raised in the petition with regard to sale of power to the distribution licensees through the trader along with an interim prayer for identical relief. 2 O.P.No. 70 of 2012 DISCOMs GMR Vemagiri Power Generation Ltd (GVPGL) Petition filed by the petitioners requesting the Commission to ascertain the losses of respondent, if any, and to fix up the rate of additional fixed charges and the period for truing-up to make good of the alleged losses if any, after duly considering the claim of petitioners for extension of PPA period and to issue consent to the proposed amendments as per the Commission orders dt.05.12.2009 to the amended agreement to the PPA dt. 02.05.2007 and 18.06.2003. 3 O.P.No. 71 of 2012 GMR Vemagiri Power Generation Ltd (GVPGL) DISCOMs Petition u/s 86 (1) (b) of the Electricity Act, 2003 seeking consent of the Commission to the amendments to the PPA as proposed by the parties in terms of order dt. 05.12.2009. However, in its order dt. 27.08.2012 in O.P (SR) No. 71 of 2011, Commission decided to ascertain losses of the petitioner, if any, in the first instance. 4 O.P. No. 72 of 2012 GMR Vemagiri Power Generation Ltd (GVPGL) DISCOMs & APPCC Petition u/s 86 (1) (f) of the Electricity Act, 2003 claiming compensation of Rs. 447 crs (on NPV basis as on COD) towards loss of Capacity Charges for the period upto 10.04.2009 Schedule of hearings before APERC as on 18.06.2015 The following cases are listed for hearing before the Commission on the dates mentioned below HEARING SCHEDULED ON 20.06.2015 (Saturday) AT 11.00 AM 4 O.P. No. 72 of 2012 GMR Vemagiri Power Generation Ltd (GVPGL) DISCOMs & APPCC Petition u/s 86 (1) (f) of the Electricity Act, 2003 claiming compensation of Rs. 447 crs (on NPV basis as on COD) towards loss of Capacity Charges for the period upto 10.04.2009 5 O.P. No. 58 of 2013 & I.A. No. 31 of 2013 M/s. GMR Vemagiri Power Generation Ltd APPCC, APTRANSCO & DISCOMs Petition u/s 86 (1) (f) of the Electricity Act, 2003 seeking a declaration that respondents are liable to refund the Capacity Charges deducted from from the monthly invoices of the petitioner from October, 2012 onwards amounting to Rs. 121.62 crs and for award of interest till payment, I.A. filed by the petitioner seeking to (a) declare that the actions of the respondents to effect deduction in the payment abstract of January, 2013 are violative of the provisions of the PPA and consequently (b) grant interim directions to the respondents restraining them forthwith from making any further / future deduction during pendency of the aforesaid petition (c) direct the respondents to forthwith refund the deduction made by them in the monthly tariff bill payment for the month of January and (d) direct the respondents to continue the payment of capacity charges as per the provisions of the PPA 6 O.P. No. 12 of 2013 GMR Vemagiri Power Generation Ltd. APPCC, APTRANSCO & DISCOMs Petition u/s 86 (1) (f) of the Electricity Act, 2003 seeking reimbursement of minimum fuel off take charges and other transportation charges from the respondents 7 O.P. No. 68 of 2012 Axis Wind Energy Ltd. & others GoAP & others Petition seeking framing guidelines determining evacuation policy and wheeling charges for captive generation or sale to third parties 8 R.P. No. 4 of 2013 in O.P. No. 13 of 2012 Axis Energy Ventures (India) Pvt. Ltd & others Indian Wind Energy Association (InWEA) & DISCOMs Petition u/s 94 (1) (f) of the Electricity Act, 2003 for review of the order in O.P. No. 13 of 2012 dated 15.11.2012 9 O.P.No. 59 of 2011 & I.A. No. 2 of 2012 Indian Wind Power Association NEDCAP, APCPDCL & APTRANSCO Petition seeking issuance of Regulations for determination of RE tariff based on CERC (Terms & Conditions for tariff determination from Renewable Energy Sources) Regulations, dated 16.09.2009 for procurement of Wind Energy by Distribution Licensees 10 O.P. No. 46 of 2014 KSK Mahanadi Power Company Ltd APEPDCL & APSPDCL Petition filed under Section 86 (1) (f) of the Electricity Act, 2003 seeking adjudication of disputes arising under the Power Purchase Agreement dated 31.07.2012 between the parties 11 O.P. No. 13 of 2014 KSK Mahanadi Power Company Ltd APEPDCL & APSPDCL Petition u/s 86 (1) (f) of the Electricity Act, 2003 for adjudication of dispute relating to claim of respondents towards liquidated damages of Rs. 23.60 crs under Article 4.8 of the Power Purchase Agreement (PPA) dated 31-07-2012 entered between the parties 12 O.P. No. 14 of 2014 DISCOMs & APPCC KSK Mahanadi Power Company Ltd & 4 others Petition u/s 86 (1) (f) of the Electricity Act, 2003 for directions on illegal claim of Rs. 66.31 crs towards the transmission charges for the period 16th June, 2013 to 13th August, 2013 and capacity charges for the period 16th June, 2013 to 26th July, 2013 by illegal invoking Letter of Credit by M/s. KSK Mahanadi Power Company Ltd., for the period without supplying power to the petitioners 13 OP No. 3 of 2015 APSPDCL & APEPDCL KSK Mahanadi Power Company Ltd Petition filed under Section 86 (1) (b) of the Electricity Act, 2003 seeking approval to purchase power from the respondent 14 O.P.No. 14 of 2015 M/s. Hetero Wind Power Ltd APTRANSCO Petition under Sections 86 (1), (a), (e) and (k) read with Article 15 of Regulation 2 of 2006 seeking execution of Tariff Order dated 09.05.2014 with regard to exemption of transmission and wheeling charges for the petitioner’s wind power project at Thirumalayapalli in Kadapa District as Group Captive Project to cater to the needs of the Group Companies in the State of Andhra Pradesh 15 O.P.No. 20 of 2014 Silkroad Sugar Pvt. Ltd CMD / APTRANSCO CE / APTRANSCO 15 O.P.No. 20 of 2014 Silkroad Sugar Petitioner u/s 33 (4) & 86 (1) (f) of the Electricity Act, 2003 in the matter of refund of excess recovered amount of Rs.2,51,55,786/- Pvt. Ltd CMD / APTRANSCO CE / APTRANSCO Petitioner u/s 33 (4) & 86 (1) (f) of the Electricity Act, 2003 in the matter of refund of excess recovered amount of Rs.2,51,55,786/- 16 I.A.No. 13 of 2015 in SR No. 5 of 2015 APSPDCL & APEPDCL --NIL- Application under Clause 59 of the APERC (Conduct of Business) Regulations, 1999 requesting the Commission to condone delay of 170 days in filing the review petition of Tariff Order on Wheeling Tariff for Distribution Business for FY 2014-15 to FY 2018-19 dated 09-05-2015 17 O.P. No. 42 of 2009 & I.A. No. 4 of 2010 Lanco Kondapalli Power Ltd APPCC, APTRANSCO & DISCOMs Petition u/s 62, 86 (1) (f) of the Electricity Act, 2003 claiming finance and procurement costs payable by the respondents together with interest thereon and I.A. No. 4 of 2010 filed by the respondents 18 O.P. No. 85 of 2012 Lanco Kondapalli Power Ltd APPCC, APTRANSCO & DISCOMs Petition u/s 86 (1) (f) for reimbursement of Minimum Fuel Off-take Charges and other fuel transportation charges being part of monthly bills 19 O.P.No. 40 of 2014 Bharath Alluminium Company Ltd PTC India Ltd., & 2 others Petition filed under Section 86 (1) (f) of the Electricity Act, 2003 for recovery of compensation deducted from the petitioner purportedly towards non-supply of power 20 O.P (SR) No. 25 of 2013 & I.A (SR) No. 80 of 2013 RVK Energy Pvt. Ltd APPCC & 9 others Petition u/s 86 (1) (f) of the Electricity Act, 2003 for claim for price of the power supplied by the petitioner to Andhra Pradesh Power Coordination Committee (APPCC) - Hearing before admission I.A filed by the petitioner u/s 94 of the Act 21 O.P. No. 79 of 2012 Reliance Infrastructure Ltd DISCOMs & APPCC Petition u/s 86 (1) (f) of Electricity Act, 2003 seeking to restrain the DISCOMs from deducting from the monthly bills amounts towards deemed generation 22 O.P. No. 60 of 2013 & I.A. No. 37 of 2013 APPCC & DISCOMs Reliance Infrastructure Ltd Petition filed u/s 86 (1) (f) of the Electricity Act, 2003 In the matter of “Ineligibility of Availability declarations with Alternate Fuel (Naphtha / HSD) by the respondent, after the year 2009, and for deletion of alternate fuel clause” IA filed by the petitioners u/s 128 of the Electricity Act, 2003 for appointment of a committee of technical officers and direct them to investigate the issue as to whether there were tanks for storing Naptha at the project of the respondent and after the year 2009 and as to the probable date of dismantling of Naptha tanks, by inspecting the project premises and the records 23 I.A. No. 3 of 2014 in O.P. No. 12 of 2014 Reliance Infrastructure Ltd DISCOMs & APPCC Interlocutory Application filed by the petitioner u/s 94 (2) of the Electricity Act, 2003 for restraining the respondents from deducting the capacity charges from the petitioner Petition filed by the petitioner u/s 86 (1) (f) of the Electricity Act, 2003 seeking declaration that HSD is a alternative Fuel in terms of Article 1.1.27 of the PPA and refund the unauthorized deductions of Rs.96,68,92,198/- made by the respondents from the bills payable to the petitioner 24 O.P. No. 15 of 2014 E.I.D. Parry (India) Ltd APTRANSCO & DISCOMs Petition u/s 86 (1) (f) of the Electricity Act, 2003 in relation to non-payment of fixed charges by truing annualized threshold PLF of 55% as per the tariff determined by the Commission to the petitioner under the Power Purchase Agreement 25 O.P.No. 18 of 2014 Green energy Association APEPDCL, APSPDCL & APSLDC Petition u/s 142 of the Electricity Act, 2003 for non-compliance of Regulation 7 (1) & (2) and 9 of the APERC Renewable Power Purchase Obligation (Compliance by Purchase of Renewable Energy / Renewable Energy Certificate) Regulation, 2012 26 O.P. No. 44 of 2014 International Paper APPM Ltd (The Andhra Pradesh Paper Mills Ltd) 26 O.P. No. 44 of 2014 International APSLDC Petition seeking accreditation of the petitioner’s renewable energy project Paper APPM Ltd (The Andhra Pradesh Paper Mills Ltd) APSLDC Petition seeking accreditation of the petitioner’s renewable energy project 27 O.P. No. 60 of 2012 & I.A. No. 9 of 2015 Nile Ltd APSPDCL Petition Seeking directions for payment on the monthly power bills 28 O.P. No. 17 of 2015 M/s. IL & FS Wind Farms Ltd APSPDCL & 3 others Petition under Sections 142, 143 / 146 & 129 of the Electricity Act, 2003 for punishment for non-compliance of directions of the Commission and for implementation of its orders 29 O.P. No. 36 of 2014 GMR Vemagiri Power Generation Ltd APPCC & 5 others Petition filed under Section 30 of Andhra Pradesh Electricity Reform Act, 1999 (Reform Act) read with clauses 55 and 62 of the APERC Conduct of Business Regulation, 1999 (CBR) seeking implementation of the order dt. 27.11.2012 of the Commission regarding reimbursement of MAT in O.P.No. 26 of 2012 30 I.A. No. 11 of 2015 in O.P. No. 26 of 2012 GMR Vemagiri Power Generation Ltd APPCC, APTRANSCO & 4 DISCOMs Claim for reimbursement of Minimum Alternate Tax (MAT) payable by the respondents as per the PPA, in compliance with the orders of the Hon'ble Supreme Court of India passed in its Record of Proceedings dt. 13-03-2015 in Civil Appeal Dairy No. 17120 of 2014. 31 O.P. No. 18 of 2015 M/s. PTC India Ltd M/s. Meenakshmi Energy Pvt Ltd & 3 others Petition u/s 86 (1) (f) of the Electricity Act, 2003 for directing the Respondent No. 1 to supply power as per terms of PPA 32 O.P. No. 19 of 2015 M/s. PTC India Ltd M/s. Simhapuri Energy Ltd & 3 others Petition u/s 86 (1) (f) of the Electricity Act, 2003 for restraining the Respondent to sell electricity outside the PPA 33 I.A. No. 19 of 2015 in O.P. No. 21 of 2013 GVK Gautami Power Ltd APEPDCL & 7 others Petitioner filed a “Memo” requesting the Commission to assess and quantify the amounts payable to the petitioner by the respondents towards reimbursement of MAT dues, including the interest payable on account of delay in reimbursement of MAT as per the Amended and Restated PPA and in compliance with the orders of the Hon’ble Supreme Court of India passed dated 27-03-2015 in Civil Appeal Nos. 3006 & 3007 of 2015. S.No. Case No. Petitioner Respondent Subject / Prayer 1 O.P No. 50 of 2013 & I.A. No. 26 of 2013 M/s. KCP Limited APTRANSCO & SPDCL & 2 others Petition u/s 86 (1) (f) of the Electricity Act, 2003 in relation to billing on reactive power surcharge on reactive power drawn by the petitioner’s Mini-Hydel project under the amended and restated Power Wheeling & Purchase Agreement dt. 17.03.1999 Interlocutory Application No. 26 of 2013, also filed by the petitioner for stay of collection of demand for reactive power surcharge and surcharge thereon under the APERC (Conduct of Business) Regulations, 1999 2 O.P. No. 51 of 2014 & I.A. No. 14 of 2014 M/s. Shree Jayalakshmi Powercorp Ltd APTRANSCO & APSPDCL & 2 others Petition filed under Section 86 (1) (f) of the Electricity Act, 2003 in relation to billing on reactive power surcharge on reactive power drawn by petitioner (Mini Hydel Power Plant) under Amended and Restated Power Wheeling & Purchase Agreement dt. 03.09.1998 and the application for interim relief 3 O.P. No. 52 of 2014 & I.A. No. 15 of 2014 M/s. Espar Pak Ltd APTRANSCO & APSPDCL & 2 others Petition filed under Section 86 (1) (f) of the Electricity Act, 2003 in relation to billing on reactive power surcharge on reactive power drawn by petitioner (Mini Hydel Power Plant) under Power Wheeling & Purchase Agreement dt. 11.01.2000 and the application for interim relief 4 O.P. No. 53 of 2014 & I.A. No. 16 of 2014 M/s. Tirumala Cotton & Agro Pvt Ltd APTRANSCO & APSPDCL & 2 others Petition under Section 86 (1) (f) of the Electricity Act, 2003 in relation to billing on reactive power surcharge on reactive power drawn by petitioner (Mini Hydel Power Plant) under Amended and Restated Power Wheeling & Purchase Agreement dt. 19.10.2000 and the application for interim relief 5 O.P. No. 54 of 2014 & I.A. No. 17 of 2014 M/s. Akshay Profiles Pvt Ltd APTRANSCO & APSPDCL & 2 others Petition under Section 86 (1) (f) of the Electricity Act, 2003 in relation to billing on reactive power surcharge on reactive power drawn by petitioner (Mini Hydel Power Plant) under Power Purchase & Wheeling Agreement dt. 11.01.2000 and the application for interim relief HEARING SCHEDULED ON 27.06.2015 (Saturday) AT 11.00 AM 5 O.P. No. 54 of 2014 & I.A. No. 17 of 2014 M/s. Akshay Profiles Pvt Ltd APTRANSCO & APSPDCL & 2 others Petition under Section 86 (1) (f) of the Electricity Act, 2003 in relation to billing on reactive power surcharge on reactive power drawn by petitioner (Mini Hydel Power Plant) under Power Purchase & Wheeling Agreement dt. 11.01.2000 and the application for interim relief 6 O.P. No. 55 of 2014 & I.A. No. 1 of 2015 M/s. RPP Ltd APSPDCL Petition under Section 86 (1) (f) of the Electricity Act, 2003 seeking dispute with regard to the demands for surcharge for reactive energy and delayed payment surcharge thereon in respect of Mini Hydel Power Plant of the petitioner 7 O.P. No. 58 of 2014 & I.A. No. 18 of 2014 M/s. Sri Dhanalakshmi Cotton & Rice Mills Pvt Ltd APTRANSCO & APSPDCL & 2 others Petition under Section 86 (1) (f) of the Electricity Act, 2003 in relation to billing on reactive power surcharge on reactive power drawn by petitioner (Mini Hydel Power Plant) under Amended and Restated Power Wheeling & Purchase Agreement dt. 25.07.1998 and the application for interim relief 8 O.P. No. 9 of 2015 M/s. Gowthami Solvent Oils (Pvt) Limited APEPDCL Petition under Section 142 of the Electricity Act, 2003 and Regulations 8 (1) of the APERC (Conduct of Business Rules) Regulations 1999 in relation to non-payment of fixed costs from 01-04-2016 to 23-06-2014, inspite of the Commission’s order dated 19-07-2014 in O.P. No. 11 of 2010 determining the fixed cost 9 O.P. No. 10 of 2015 Lanco Kondapalli Power Ltd APPCC, APSPDCL & APEPDCL Petition under Section 86 (1) (f) of the Electricity Act, 2003 claiming reimbursement of Bank Guarantee Commission being part of Finance & Procurement costs 10 O.P. No. 12 of 2015 Indira Power Pvt Ltd APSPDCL & 7 others Petition under Section 86 (1) (f) of the Electricity Act, 2003 read with Regulation 55 of the APERC (Conduct of Business) Regulations, 1999 seeking declaration that the petitioner’s 700 kWp Solar PV power plant is entitled to draw power without a High Tension Service Connection with minimum contacted demand of 70 kVA & other reliefs. 11 O.P.No. 15 of 2015 and I.A. Nos. 14 & 15 of 2015 Deccan Cements Ltd APTRANSCO & APSPDCL Petition under Section 86 (1) (f) of the Electricity Act, 2003 for modifying the Power Purchase and Captive Wheeling Agreement dated 15-02- 2002 (amended in 26-05-2004) to the extent of permitting the petitioner to sell the power generated by it to third parties within the State of Andhra Pradesh as the agreement has become impossible to perform in its present form and further permitting the petitioner to sell the banked energy and the energy fed into the grid from 01-09-2014 to third parties within the State of Andhra Pradesh 12 R.P (SR) No. 62 of 2013 in O.P. No. 6 & 7 of 2009 Guttaseema Wind Energy Company Pvt. Ltd APTRANSCO & DISCOMs Petition for review of the order in O.P. Nos. 6 & 7 of 2009 dated 22.04.2013 13 R.P (SR) No. 98 of 2013 in O.P. No. 6 & 7 of 2009 APTRANSCO & DISCOMs Guttaseema Wind Energy Company Pvt. Ltd ---do--- 14 O.P. No. 8 of 2013 & I.A. No. 1 of 2013 GVK Gautami Power Ltd DISCOMs, APPCC & APTRANSCO Petition u/s 86 (1) (f) Electricity Act, 2003 seeking declaration that the petitioner is required to be compensated for capacity charges, transportation charges and imbalance charges. 15 O.P. No. 9 of 2013 & I.A. No. 2 of 2013 GVK Industries Ltd DISCOMs, APPCC & APTRANSCO ---do--- 16 O.P. No. 12 of 2008 GVK Industries Ltd DISCOMs & APPCC 16 O.P. No. 12 of 2008 GVK Industries Petition u/s 86 (1) (f) of the Electricity Act, 2003 in respect of certain claims amounting to Rs. 262 crs Ltd DISCOMs & APPCC Petition u/s 86 (1) (f) of the Electricity Act, 2003 in respect of certain claims amounting to Rs. 262 crs 17 O.P. No. 19 of 2009 APTRANSCO & 4 DISCOMs GVK Industries Ltd Petition u/s 86 of the Electricity Act, 2003 seeking calculation of interest on working capital for computation of fixed charges, limiting the working capital amount to the actual borrowings 18 O.P. No. 37 of 2014 & I.A. No. 9 of 2014 Spectrum Power Generation Ltd APTRANSCO & 5 others Petition filed under Section 86 (1) (f) of the Electricity Act, 2003 seeking adjudication of disputes between the parties, along with Interlocutory Application (I.A. No. 9 of 2014) 19 O.P. No. 38 of 2014 Spectrum Power Generation Ltd APTRANSCO & 5 others Petition filed under Section 86 (1) (f) of the Electricity Act, 2003 seeking adjudication of disputes between the parties. 20 O.P.No. 56 of 2014 Spectrum Power Generation Ltd APTRANSCO & 5 others Petition filed under Section 86 (1) (f) read with Sections 86 (1) (a) and 86 (1) (k) of the Electricity Act, 2003 for approval of completed capital cost incurred by the petitioner 21 O.P.No. 10 of 2014 Spectrum Power Generation Ltd APTRANSCO, DISCOMs & APPCC Petition u/s 86 (1) (f) of the Electricity Act, 2003 for adjudication of disputes between the parties with regard to Minimum Off Take Charges 22 O.P.No. 57 of 2011 APTRANSCO Spectrum Power Generation Ltd Petition u/s 86 (1) (b) of the Electricity Act, 2003 seeking deletion of usage of Naptha as supplementary fuel and others as alternate fuel 23 O.P. No. 1 of 2014 DISCOMs GVK Gautami Power Ltd Petition u/s 86 (1) (b) and (f) of the Electricity Act, 2003 for deletion of the clause reflecting alternate fuel in the definition of the “Fuel” in the PPA entered by the parties 24 O.P. No. 2 of 2014 DISCOMs GVK Industries Ltd ---do--- 25 O.P No. 24 of 2013 & I.A.No. 14 of 2013 M/s. GVK Industries Ltd (Phase-II) DISCOMs & APTRANSCO Petition u/s 86 (1) (f) of the Electricity Act, 2003 for adjudication of disputes between the parties and the IA also filed by the petitioner for interim orders. 26 O.P.No. 23 of 2013 GVK Industries Ltd DISCOMs & APPCC Petition u/s 86 (1) (f) of the Electricity Act, 2003 seeking to recover several amounts due to it under various provisions of the PPA 27 O.P. No. 34 of 2014 GVK Industries Ltd APEPDCL & 5 others Petition filed for adjudication of disputes between the parties 28 R.P. No. 1 of 2014 in O.P. No. 44 of 2013 APTRANSCO & 5 others (Respondents in main case) Spectrum Power Generation Ltd (Petitioner in main case) Petition filed under Section 94 (1) (f) of the Electricity Act, 2003 seeking review the Commission’s order dt. 27.07.2013 in O.P. No. 44 of 2013 29 O.P. No. 33 of 2009 Lanco Kondapalli Power Ltd APPCC, APTRANSCO & DISCOMs Petition u/s 86 (1) (f) of the Electricity Act, 2003 claiming capacity charges payable by the respondents and also interest payable thereon 30 O.P.No. 51 of 2013 Penna Cement Industries Ltd APTRANSCO, APPCC & DISCOMs Petition u/s 86 (1) (f) of the Electricity Act, 2003 seeking to recover the amount Rs.2,66,34,295/- towards pending dues on account of supply of electricity 31 RP No. 1 / 2010 in O.P. Nos. 17 to 20 / 2008 M/s. RPP Ltd DISCOMs Petition for reviewing the tariff order dated 20.03.2009 in O.P. No.s 17 to 20 of 2009 in respect of wheeling tariff for FY 2009-10 to 2013-14 and RST for FY 2009-10. 31 RP No. 1 / 2010 in O.P. Nos. 17 to 20 / 2008 M/s. RPP Ltd DISCOMs Petition for reviewing the tariff order dated 20.03.2009 in O.P. No.s 17 to 20 of 2009 in respect of wheeling tariff for FY 2009-10 to 2013-14 and RST for FY 2009-10. 32 RP No. 2 / 2010 in O.P. No. 21 / 2008 M/s. RPP Ltd APTRANSCO Petition for review of tariff order dated 20.03.2009 in O.P. No.s 17 to 20 of 2009 in respect of transmission tariff for FY 2009-10 to 2013-14. 33 RP No. 3 / 2010 in O.P. Nos. 17 to 20 / 2008 KCP & 2 others APPCC, APTRANSCO & DISCOMs Petition for review of tariff order dated 20.03.2009 in O.P. No.s 17 to 20 of 2009 in respect of wheeling tariff for FY 2009-10 to 2013-14. 34 RP No. 4 / 2010 in O.P. No. 21 / 2008 KCP & 2 others APPCC, APTRANSCO & DISCOMs Petition for review of tariff order dated 20.03.2009 in O.P. No.s 17 to 20 of 2009 in respect of transmission tariff for FY 2009-10 to 2013-14. 35 RP No. 5 / 2010 in OP Nos. 17 to 20 / 2009 Small Hydro Power Developers Association & 16 others DISCOMs Petition for review of tariff order dated 20.03.2009 in O.P. No.s 17 to 20 of 2009 in respect of wheeling tariff for FY 2009-10 to 2013-14. S.No. Case No. Petitioner Respondent Subject / Prayer 1 O.P. No. 57 of 2014 & I.A. No. 8 of 2015 Sardar Power Pvt Ltd APEPDCL Petition filed for determination of capital cost and consequent re-determination of tariff for the first 10 years of operation with effect from 17.07.2008 (being COD of the project) pursuant to the Judgment of Hon’ble ATE dt. 20.12.2012 in Appeal No. 172 of 2011 and batch 2 R.P. No. 2 of 2014 in O.P. No. 41 of 2014 APEPDCL M/s. Sai Renewable Pvt. Ltd Petition filed under Section 94 (1) (f) of the Electricity Act, 2003 seeking review of the orders of the Commission dt. 01.09.2014 in O.P. No. 41 of 2014 in the matter of determination of fixed cost tariff for 11 to 20 years of operation for Industrial Waste Projects 3 R.P. No. 3 of 2015 in O.P. No. 8 of 2015 M/s. ITC Ltd APSPDCL & APEPDCL Petition for review of the Commission’s order dated 15.04.2015 in O.P. No. 8 of 2015 (Suo-motu) 4 R.P. No. 4 of 2015 in O.P. No. 8 of 2015 M/s. The Andhra Sugars Ltd APEPDCL Petition for review of the Commission’s order dated 15.04.2015 in O.P. No. 8 of 2015 (Suo-motu) 5 R.P. No. 5 of 2015 & I.A. No. 17 of 2015 in O.P. No. 8 of 2015 M/s. Synergies Castings Ltd APSPDCL & APEPDCL Petition for review of the Commission’s order dated 15.04.2015 in O.P. No. 8 of 2015 (Suo-motu) and the Interlocutory Application seeking stay of all further proceedings in pursuance of order Dt. 15-04-2015 in O.P. No. 8 of 2015 HEARING SCHEDULED ON 04.07.2015 (Saturday) AT 11.00 AM 5 R.P. No. 5 of 2015 & I.A. No. 17 of 2015 in O.P. No. 8 of 2015 M/s. Synergies Castings Ltd APSPDCL & APEPDCL Petition for review of the Commission’s order dated 15.04.2015 in O.P. No. 8 of 2015 (Suo-motu) and the Interlocutory Application seeking stay of all further proceedings in pursuance of order Dt. 15-04-2015 in O.P. No. 8 of 2015 6 R.P. No. 6 of 2015 in O.P. No. 8 of 2015 M/s. Vedik Ispat Pvt Ltd APSPDCL & APEPDCL Petition for review of the Commission’s order dated 15.04.2015 in O.P. No. 8 of 2015 (Suo-motu) 7 R.P. No. 7 of 2015 in O.P. No. 8 of 2015 M/s. Mahrishi Alloys Pvt Ltd APSPDCL & APEPDCL Petition for review of the Commission’s order dated 15.04.2015 in O.P. No. 8 of 2015 (Suo-motu) 8 R.P. No. 8 of 2015 & I.A. No. 18 of 2015 in O.P. No. 8 of 2015 M/s. Andhra Spinning Mills Association APSPDCL & APEPDCL Petition for review of the Commission’s order dated 15.04.2015 in O.P. No. 8 of 2015 (Suo-motu) and Interlocutory Application seeking stay of all further proceedings in pursuance of order the dt.15-04-2015 in O.P. No. 8 of 2015 9 R.P. No. 9 of 2015 in O.P. No. 8 of 2015 M/s. Deccan Cements Ltd APSPDCL & APEPDCL Petition for review of the Commission’s order dated 15.04.2015 in O.P. No. 8 of 2015 (Suo-motu) 10 R.P. No. 10 of 2015 in O.P. No. 8 of 2015 M/s. Sree Rayalaseema Alkalies and Allied Chemicals Ltd APSPDCL Petition for review of the Commission’s order dated 15.04.2015 in O.P. No. 8 of 2015 (Suo-motu) 11 I.A. No. 16 of 2015 in R.P. No. 2 of 2015 in Suo Motu Order No. 1 of 2015 Guttaseema Wind Energy Company Pvt Ltd APSPDCL & APEPDCL Petition under Section 94 (1) (f) of the Electricity Act, 2003 read with Clause 49 of the APERC (Conduct of Business) Regulations, 1999 for review of the suo Motu order No. 1 of 2015 dated 27-03-2015 12 RP No. 1 of 2015 & IA No. 10 of 2015 APTRANSCO --NIL- Petition filed under Section 94 (1) (f) of the Electricity Act, 2003 seeking review and / or modification and / or rectification of errors in the Order dated 09-05-2014 passed in O.P.No. 62 of 2013, wherein the Commission determined Transmission Tariff for FY 2014-15 to FY 2018-19 and the application for interim relief 13 O.P. No. 35 of 2014 & I.A. No. 8 of 2014 RVK Energy Pvt Ltd CE / Vijayawada Zone / APTRANSCO & APTRANSCO Petition filed u/s 86 (1) (f) of the Electricity Act, 2003 for refund of illegal deductions of O & M charges towards the line and bay connection maintenance expenses and Interim Application also filed by the petitioner u/s 94 (2) of the Electricity Act, 2003 for interim directions against respondents 14 --- --- --- Public Hearing on Drat terms and conditions for tariff determination for upcoming Wind Energy Power Projects in the State of Andhra Pradesh for the period FY 2015-16 to FY 2019-20 S.No. Case No. Petitioner Respondent Subject / Prayer 1 O.P.No.495 of 2003 AP TRANSCO M/s.Andhra Pradesh Paper Mills & others Commission by order dated 22-03-2004 determined Bulk Supply Tariff, Transmission Charges, SLDC Charges (Common order in O.P.Nos. 495 to 499 of 2003) 2 O.P.No.496 of 2003 APEPDCL M/s.Andhra Pradesh Paper Mills & others Commission by order dt 22-3-2004 determined distribution and retail supply tariffs (Common order in O.P.Nos. 495 to 499 of 2003) 3 O.P.No.497 of 2003 APCPDCL M/s.Andhra Pradesh Paper Mills & others -do- 4 O.P.No.498 of 2003 APNPDCL M/s.Andhra Pradesh Paper Mills & others -do- 5 O.P.No.499 of 2003 APSPDCL M/s.Andhra Pradesh Paper Mills & others -doHEARING SCHEDULED ON 24.07.2015 (Friday) at 02.30 PM 5 O.P.No.499 of 2003 APSPDCL M/s.Andhra Pradesh Paper Mills & others -do- 6 O.P. No. 30 /2004 APTRANSCO Small Hydro Power Developers ' Association & others Commission by order dated 22-03-2005 determined Bulk Supply Tariff, Transmission Charges, SLDC Charges (Common order in O.P.Nos. 30 to 34 of 2004) 7 O.P. No. 31 /2004 APCPDCL Small Hydro Power Developers ' Association & others Commission by order dt 22-3-2005 determined distribution and retail supply tariffs (Common order in O.P.Nos. 30 to 34 of 2004) 8 O.P. No. 32 /2004 APEPDCL Small Hydro Power Developers ' Association & others -do- 9 O.P. No. 33 /2004 APNPDCL Small Hydro Power Developers ' Association & others -do- 10 O.P. No. 34 /2004 APSPDCL Small Hydro Power Developers ' Association & others -do- 11 O.P.No.1 of 2006 APTRANSCO Small Hydro Power Developers ' Association & others Determination of tariffs including transmission charges.Certain generators questioned the Tariff Order dt.23.03.2006 in respect of levy of transmission charges. 12 O.P.No.2 of 2006 APCPDCL Small Hydro Power Developers ' Association & others Commission by a common order dated 23-03-2006 determined distribution tariff for control period 2006-07 to 08-09 and RST for FY 2006-07for 4 discoms 13 O.P.No.3 of 2006 APEPDCL Small Hydro Power Developers ' Association & others -do- 14 O.P.No.4 of 2006 APNPDCL Small Hydro Power Developers ' Association & others 14 O.P.No.4 of 2006 APNPDCL Small Hydro Power -doDevelopers ' Association & others -do- 15 O.P.No.5 of 2006 APSPDCL Small Hydro Power Developers ' Association & others -do- 16 O.P. No. 11 of 2015 APSPDCL & APEPDCL Konaseema Gas Power Ltd Petition under Section 86 (1) (b) and (f) of the Electricity Act, 2003 to delete Clause reflecting alternate fuel in the definition of “Fuel” in the PPA entered by M/s. Konaseema Gas Power Ltd., with APTRANSCO, APDISCOMs, S.No. Case No. Petitioner Respondent Subject / Prayer 1 OP No. 16 of 2010 & IA No. 7 of 2011 Tata Trading Company DISCOMs & APTRANSCO Petition seeking the illegal, unilateral and wrongful deductions towards illegal compensation claim for supply of short term power Interlocutory petition filed by the petitioner in the OP seeking interim orders for release of the amounts on production of bank guarantee pending disposal of the main O.P. i.e., O.P. No. 16 of 2010 HEARING SCHEDULED ON 31.07.2015 (Friday) at 02.30 PM

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generation plants and load centers - Telangana state

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Generation station-wise capacities , Telangana share and PPA expiry

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list of substations in telangana & it's present capacities

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revised power supply schedule for agricultural consumers

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revised_schdule 

power generation during 2014-15

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http://epowerone.com/Content/Upload/ba6fb4a5-c03a-4df7-a17a-4053ba84de9c.pdf

New Power Tariff in Andhra Pradesh w.e.f April '15

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New_Tariff_AP

New Power Tariff in Telangana w.e.f April '15

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Reservoir Levels

Reservoir Levels, Storages and Equivalent Energy Updated on 21-March Click here to find detailed report.

Kakatiya TPP wins First position

Kakatiya TPP (500 MW) of TSGENCO stood First with 94.97% PLF among all state and central sector power stations during Apr-14 to Jan-15

India Smart Grid Week (ISGW) 2015

ISGW 2015 is planned as a Conference cum Exhibition that will bring together India's leading Electricity Utilities, Policy Makers, Regulators, Investors and world's top-notch Smart Grid and Smart City Experts and Researchers to discuss trends, share best practices and showcase next generation technologies and products.

The emergence of India as a strong economic power is receiving widespread recognition in the world. On the other hand, although we operate the fourth largest power system in the world, one-third of our population have no access to electricity and our percapita consumption of electricity is one-fourth of the world average! Transmission and Distribution losses in India are also quite high - about 26% in distribution and more than 7% in transmission! Government of India (GoI) and other stakeholders have realized that by implementing incremental improvements in a business as usual scenario we will not be able to provide 24x7 electricity to all households in the country - it requires innovative strategies, breakthrough technologies and bold decisions. In 2013, GoI issued Smart Grid Vision and Roadmap for India; and the newly elected Government in India is committed to provide 24x7 electricity to all households in next 5 years and has recently launched 3 focused programs towards this objective with a total capital outlay of US$ 14 billion. The new Government has also announced an ambitious program to build 100 Smart Cities on fast track. With all these ground breaking initiatives, India has already emerged as the prime destination for Smart Grids and Smart Cities. ISGF is organizing India Smart Grid Week (ISGW 2015) from 02 – 06 March, 2015 at Bangalore.
 

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STORING WIND POWER AS ICE?

STORING WIND POWER AS ICE?

Posted in Energy Inventions | Wind Power | Sanjay technical |

Wind Power IceOf the total amount of electricity generated by all sources, about 75% is used by buildings, a major fraction of which is consumed by air conditioners. With the demand of renewable energy increasing with every passing day, inventors are trying to find the best possible means to store the generated energy during the best time, to provide power when the generators aren’t getting the resources they need. It is a natural phenomenon that the wind blows stronger at night than in the day. We don’t need that extra energy during nighttime. We can store this energy and use it during daytime when the load is too much on the grid.

When we utilize alternative sources of energy, how to store the energy poses a big problem. Scientists often create giant sized batteries or compressed air and hydroelectric storage. But now a company, Calmac Booth is thinking of storing extra power in ice!

Air conditioning in the summer consumes the lion’s share of a building’s energy cost. Calmac Booth is manufacturing a hybrid cooling system. This system exploits an ice bank thermal energy storage tank known as IceBank. IceBank makes and stores ice for use in air conditioning systems when the wind is blowing a bit faster or the sun isn’t shining, that is, at night.

Heavily insulated polyethylene is used to manufacture the IceBank tanks. They also contain a spiral-wound, polyethylene-tube heat exchanger surrounded with water. The tanks are available in a variety of sizes. According to one’s need it is available from 45 to over 500 ton-hours. When the charging cycle is going on, a solution containing 25% ethylene or propylene glycol is cooled by a chiller. In the next step this solution is circulated through the heat exchanger inside the IceBank tank. It has to be noted that the ethylene-based or propylene-based is an industrial coolant. These coolants are particularly devised for low viscosity and superior heat-transfer properties.

The unique property of the IcaBank is that the ice is built uniformly throughout the tank. Charging cycle of an IceBank tank takes about 6 to 12 hours. This device can also be utilized in conjunction with a solar panel array.

During summer time the entire system tries to survive during peak hours. IceBank simply prepares ice at night, when electricity is cheaper and it is cooler. During afternoon, this stored energy can be consumed by running air conditioning. At that time it is hot and electricity is in short supply. IceBank can help in reducing the load on the grids during peak hours. According to the company reducing electricity demand for cooling can cut energy costs by 20 – 40 percent. That reduction also translates into fewer emissions from power plants.

This system can be applicable to those buildings too which are without on-site renewable energy power generation. Ice can be prepared during night i.e. off-peak time. During off-peak, electricity is cheaper and cleaner baseload generation can be used. Calmac explains that for every kilowatt-hour of energy that is shifted from on-peak usage to off-peak, there is a decrease in the source fuel needed to generate it. This reduction can be between 8 and 30% For More Details

reservoir levels on 11-04-2015

please click on below link

http://epowerone.com/Content/Upload/6be2fba2-3f06-4156-880e-a292bb9a9720.pdf

TSGENCO, TSTRANSCO Recruit 2,681 Engineers

Hyderabad: Chief Minister K Chandrasekhara Rao decided to recruit about 2,681 engineers for power utilities of the State, Power Generation Corporation Limited (Genco) and distribution companies in view of the launching of new projects and expansion of networks. The decision was taken during the review meeting on the activities of power utilities. The CM took this decision to fill the vacancies and also to provide enough manpower. It has been decided in the meeting to recruit 1,948 assistant engineers and 733 sub-engineers. Genco will get 1,080 engineers and distribution companies will get the rest of the staff.

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